Refrigerator Troubleshooting Diagram

Archive for the ‘Capillary Tube’ tag

Restricted Capillary Tube

without comments

The capillary tube is restricted when the flow of liquid refrigerant through the tube is completely or partially interrupted. Symptoms are similar to those of a system that has lost its refrigerant. However, the major part of the refrigerant charge will be pumped into the high side (condenser), the same as with a moisture restriction. The suction pressure will range slightly below normal to very low (2 to 20 in. vacuum), depending on the amount of restriction.

Written by sam

February 7th, 2011 at 2:46 am

Posted in Freezers

Tagged with

Refrigerator Capillary Tube

without comments

This metering device is a very popular type. It is used in both refrigeration equipment, commercial and residential, and air-conditioning equipment, both residential and commercial. The small, copper tubing is sized by its I.D. (inside diameter). The liquid line from the condensing unit might be Vi-inch copper tubing. When it enters the evaporator section, the liquid line restricts down to a capillary tube with an I.D. of perhaps .065 of an inch. By restricting the refrigerant, pressure is raised on the high side of the system. The length of the tube is also relevant to the pressures. You can see that this system has a fixed metering device. If a large heat load is placed upon this type of unit, it takes a long time to remove the heat load. You can see that the thermostatic expansion valve is far superior in responding to changes in heat load. The capillary tube system works well in home units, both air conditioning and refrigeration. Figure 15-14 shows the typical capillary tube system. Care must be taken to protect the inside of the tube from becoming restricted. This is the reason for the fine mesh strainer at the entrance of the tube. All foreign particles should be trapped here and contained.

capillary-tube

Written by sam

December 24th, 2010 at 6:54 am

Posted in Basic Mechanical

Tagged with