Refrigerator Troubleshooting Diagram

Archive for the ‘Room Air Conditioners’ Category

Window-Mounted Console-Type Air Conditioners

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It is extremely desirable that a survey of the room is made prior to the actual installation of a console unit. Determine the most favorable location, taking into account the desirable location in the room, exposure of the window, width of the window, its height from the floor, and location of the electrical supply outlet. In this connection, it should be realized that since these types of units usually have a considerably larger cooling capacity than windowsill units, it will be necessary to install a special electrical connection from the meter or distribution panel directly to the location of the unit.

Figure 5-19 shows the installation of a typical console room air conditioner in a double-hung window. A normal installation of this type will allow the window to be opened or closed without interference from the duct or window filler panels. To completely close the window, the rain hood must be retracted. To adjust the height of the unit to obtain the necessary height for the duct outlet (windowsill height may differ by several inches), special wooden bases made up of several sections are usually employed (see Figure 5-20).

Written by sam

February 8th, 2011 at 3:13 am

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Console-Type Room Air-Conditioning Systems

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The console air conditioner is a self-contained unit that can come in 2-hp to 10-hp sizes. These units are used in small commercial buildings, restaurants, stores, and banks. They may be water-cooled or air-cooled.

Figure 5-16 shows an air-cooled console conditioner. In installations of this type, the unit should be located so that it can be vented to the outside to get rid of the hot air produced by the compressor and the condenser.

There are also water-cooled console air conditioners. They require connections to the local water supply, as well as a water drain and condensate drain (Figure 5-17). Note the location of the parts in Figure 5-16. Water is used to cool the compressor. In both models, the evaporator coil is mounted in the top of the unit (see Figure 5-18). Air blown through the evaporator is cooled and directed to the space to be conditioned. In some areas, a water-cooled model is not feasible.

Since the evaporator coil also traps moisture from the air, this condensate must be drained. This dehumidifying action accounts for large amounts of water on humid days. If outside air is brought in, the condensate will be more visible than if inside air is recirculated.

Installation and Service
The console air conditioner is produced by the factory ready for installation. It must be moved to a suitable location and hooked to electrical and plumbing supplies. Once located and connected, it must be checked for level. Electrical and plumbing work must conform to local codes.

Servicing the unit is simple because all the parts are located in one cabinet. Remove the panels to gain access to the compressor, valves, blowers, filter, evaporator, and motors. A maintenance schedule should be set up and followed. Most maintenance consists of changing filters and checking pressures. Cleaning the filters, cleaning the inside of the cabinet with a vacuum, and cleaning the evaporator fins are the normal service procedures.Water connections and electrical control devices should be checked for integrity. Clean the fan motor. Oil the bearings on the blowers and motors whenever specified by the manufacturers.

Written by sam

February 8th, 2011 at 3:10 am

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Room Air Conditioners Installation Methods

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After the unit is removed from the crate, the mounting frame should be located on the sill of the selected window. The window should be on the shady side of the room. If this is not possible and the unit must be exposed to the sun, then some shading of the unit should be used for greater efficiency. Awnings are most effective since they shade both the unit and window at the same time, but the awning must not restrict the free flow of air to and from the unit. The awning top must be held away from the building side so that the hot air can escape. Venetian blinds or shades are a second choice to cut down a great amount of solar heat transmitted to the room through the windows.

Before installing the unit, it should be determined first that it is the correct size for the room and that the electrical power plug is correct and adequate. Whatever type of installation is used, ensure that the location will permit proper distribution of the cooled air throughout the room (as shown in Figure 5-3) and that there is no obstruction to the outside air flow that could cause restriction or recirculation of outside air back into the unit. The installation instructions provided with the unit should be studied and followed closely. The installation information included here is only general and not intended to replace or substitute the instructions supplied with the unit. The installation should be made as neat as possible. Make certain that the unit is properly secured and that the installation is made so there is a good tight seal from the outside. It is very important that no openings are left through which rain or warm air from the outside could enter around the unit.

Written by sam

February 8th, 2011 at 3:04 am

Room Air Conditioners Capacity Requirements

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Following are the important variables to keep in mind when estimating the Btu requirements for a room cooling installation:

  • Room size in square feet of floor area
  • Wall construction (whether light or heavy)
  • Heat gain through ceiling
  • The proportion of outside wall area that is glass
  • The exposure of the room’s walls to the sun

Additional factors to be taken into account are room ceiling height, number of persons using the room, and miscellaneous heat loads (such as wattage of lamps, radio and television sets in use in the room, and so on).

Table 5-1 should be used to obtain the approximate cooling capacity in Btu. The following steps outline the procedure for using the table (which shows the Btu requirements for various sizes of rooms). In each case, it is assumed that the rooms have an 8-foot ceiling height. The procedure is as follows:

1. Measure the room to be cooled for square footage (length in feet times width in feet).
2. Determine the direction the room faces to determine which exposure to use.
3. Determine the condition of the space above the room to be cooled (such as occupied, attic, or insulated flat roof).

For example, to determine the required amount of cooling for a room 23 feet long and 13 feet wide, multiplication of the two figures will give 299 square feet. It is further assumed that the space above the room to be cooled is occupied and that the room has an exposed wall with windows facing south. Table 5-1 indicates that the room described will require a unit having a capacity of approximately 8000 Btu. A room of the same size and facing south with an uninsulated attic above it will require a cooling capacity of approximately 10,500 Btu.

Table 5-1 indicates the approximate Btu capacity required to cool different rooms with the approximate area and other conditions as described. The table will also permit checking an installed unit where unsatisfactory performance might be suspected resulting from improper sizing or inadequate unit capacity.

Written by sam

February 8th, 2011 at 3:01 am

Room Air Conditioners Cooling Capacity

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The cooling capacity of an air-conditioning unit is the ability to remove heat from a room and is usually measured in Btu per hour. The higher the Btu rating, the more heat will be removed. The capacity rating is usually given on the unit’s nameplate, together with other necessary information (such as voltage and wattage requirements). It is important that the room air-conditioning units be large enough for the room or rooms to be cooled. When dealing with large units, the term ton of refrigeration is most often used. A ton of refrigeration is equivalent to 12,000 Btu/hr. A room air conditioner rated at 10,000 Btu, for example, will supply 10/12, or 0.83, ton of refrigeration.

Written by sam

February 8th, 2011 at 2:41 am

Room Air Conditioners

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A room air conditioner is generally considered to be a unit suitable for placement in any particular room. The room in question may be in an office, a home, or a small shop. Room air conditioners are usually classed according to their design and method of installation (such as window units and portable units).

As the name implies, window units are installed on the windowsill. Portable units can be moved from one room to another as conditions and occupancy dictate. The advantages of this type of air conditioner are the relatively low-cost summer cooling in the room selected, as well as the portability and ease of installation. Figure 5-1 shows a typical window air-conditioning unit. When properly installed, sized, and serviced, the room air-conditioning unit gives a large measure of comfort, free from irritating exhaust that accompanies sweltering hot spells and extremely high humidity.

The window-type air conditioner may be divided into three functional systems: electrical, refrigerant, and air path. The electrical system consists of the motor-compressor, unit control switch, fan and fan motor, starting and running capacitors, starting relay (when used), thermostat, and necessary wiring. The refrigerant system consists of the compressor, condenser, drier-strainer, capillary tube, evaporator, tubing, and accumulator. Some systems have the refrigerant flow controlled by means of an automatic expansion valve instead of the conventional capillary-tube method. The air path consists of an air discharge and intake grille, air filter, vent door, vent controls, and so on. Figure 5-2 shows the component parts of a window air conditioner.

Written by sam

February 8th, 2011 at 2:40 am

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